iStock_000006131068MediumThe state of Rhode Island plans to be the first state to test and launch next generation 5G networks, seeking to make 5G available to all of its communities.  This past week, Governor Gina Raimondo announced a joint effort by the Public Utilities Commission, Division of Public Utilities and Carriers, and the Office of Innovation to pilot a large-scale 5G network deployment with real world testbeds to attract new high-tech businesses while lowering the cost of deployment and operation.  Citing size, population density, and regulatory flexibility, the State sees Rhode Island as “an ideal place to rollout 5G wireless” and seeks informational proposals from qualified firms and vendors in response to a Request for Information (RFI) on implementing 5G and next generation broadband infrastructure statewide.  While the state will not award funding to any respondents, the state does intend to use the information acquired in its collaboration with municipalities to develop the blueprints for three network imperatives: 5G wireless, Civic Internet of Things and an extensive fiber network.
Continue Reading Rhode Island Wants to be the First State to Offer 5G; Releases RFI

funding_opportunity_v1r1On March 18, 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) released a solicitation for up to $10 million for US Ignite: Networking Research and Application Prototypes Leading to Smart and Connected Communities, which funds the development of gigabit applications that can leverage existing, advanced network infrastructure.  The current solicitation requests applications within two Focus Areas: 1) development of application ideas and prototypes addressing areas of national priority exploring new uses for high-speed networks and 2) fundamental research advances in networking technology and protocols that furthers gigabit networking infrastructure.

Continue Reading US Ignite Announces up to $10 Million in Funding for Gigabit Applications

On NoveModern mobile devicesmber 10, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit revived several privacy claims against Google pertaining to the Internet company’s practice of side-stepping “cookie blockers” on Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Apple’s Safari browsers.

The Third Circuit found that Google could be required to respond to claims that it intentionally circumvented “cookie blockers” on Internet browsers by exploiting loopholes found in the cookie blockers and that Google was actually tracking users’ browsing habits without these users’ knowledge.  Meanwhile, Google’s privacy policy as well as a number of other public statements indicated that the company was abiding by the browsers’ cookie-blocking settings.


Continue Reading Revival of Cookie Litigation Highlights Risks Associated with Mobile Tracking Technologies

stock_02042015_0363On November 17, 2015, the Department of Labor (DOL) and the White House issued a funding announcement releasing $100 million in grants as a part of the Obama Administration’s TechHire Initiative, which specifically calls out funding to train workers in the cybersecurity and broadband industries.  DOL’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) expects to award 30-40 grants ranging from $2 million to $5 million.  Applications for the two-year grant are due March 11, 2016 with projects beginning June 1, 2016.

Continue Reading Obama Administration Announces $100 million in TechHire Grants to Support IT, Cybersecurity, Broadband Sector Training

witiThe global wearables market is estimated to grow at a compound annual rate of 35 percent over the next five years, with smartwatches leading the charge.  But where is the technology headed, and what will it take for wearables to become mainstream?  With the proliferation of smart devices, what are business and legal best practices for companies that create and sell wearables?  To lend their insight into this burgeoning market, Kelley Drye Senior Associate Kristi Wolff will participate in a Wearable Computing panel at the upcoming Women in Technology International Summit. 
Continue Reading Kelley Drye Attorney Kristi Wolff Selected to Speak at Upcoming Women in Technology International Summit

On July 11, 2014, the FCC adopted a Second Order on Reconsideration and Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking responding to a coalition of consumer groups that had pushed the FCC to reconsider its position and require that programming distributors (broadcast, cable, and satellite) include closed captioning for certain IP-delivered video clips.  The new rules

Yesterday, the FCC issued a $2.25 million Forfeiture Order against TV Max Inc. (and its affiliates and subsidiaries) for “willfully and repeatedly” violating Section 325 of the Communications Act.  The fine reflects the amount proposed in the FCC’s June 2013 Notice of Apparent Liability.  In a post-Aereo world, the FCC seems to be taking retransmission violations more seriously than ever.  In addition, following a trend in recent large enforcement orders, the FCC took the position that each day TV Max acted in contravention of Section 325 constituted a separate violation of the Commission’s rules.  This approach allowed the Commission to conclude that the statutory maximum exposure exceeded $16 million, thereby clearing room for the Commission’s $2.25 million fine.  The Commission’s discussion also provides some interesting insights into its view of permissible rebroadcasts absent retransmission consent agreements. 
Continue Reading On the Heels of Aereo, FCC Takes a Firm (and Expensive) Stance in Retransmission Consent Case