Partner John Heitmann will host an armchair discussion with FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly on Wednesday, November 29 from 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. at the offices of Kelley Drye, 101 Park Avenue, 27th Floor, New York, NY 10178. The discussion will be followed by a “Meet and Greet” brown-bag luncheon, providing an opportunity for attendees to

Last week, the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau released a Public Notice (“Notice”) urging communications service providers to review and assess how they can incorporate the recommendations from Communications Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council (“CSRIC”) V, Working Group 10 March 2017 Report to abate security signaling system 7 (“SS7”) protocol vulnerabilities(the “SS7 Report”).  SS7 is a communications protocol used within telephone networks to aid call setup, routing, billing and other functions between fixed and mobile service providers.

Continue Reading Communications Service Providers Asked to Adopt the FCC CSRIC Guidance on Signaling System 7 Vulnerability Reduction

On July 18, 2017, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (“NTIA”) hosted a virtual meeting of its multistakeholder process to address Internet of Things (“IoT”) patching and security upgrades.  The July 18th meeting represents the fourth gathering of multistakeholders in this process.

During the July 18th meeting, four working groups presented: (1) the Communicating Upgradability and Improving Transparency working group; (2) the Incentives, Barriers, and Adoption working group; (3) the Standards working group; and (4) the Technical Capabilities and Patching Expectations working group.

Continue Reading NTIA Holds Virtual Meeting of Multistakeholder Process on Internet of Things Security Upgradability and Patching

Kelley Drye is excited to support the next Presidio Forum on “Securing (and Regulating) the Internet of Things: Policy, Innovation & Investment,” in San Francisco on June 20, 2017.  The forum will present a candid discussion exploring today’s expanding IoT threat landscape, continued rise of regulatory interests and the increasing venture capital investment for IoT

On January 20, 2017, Politico Pro reported that President Trump selected Republican Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Commissioner Ajit Pai to serve as the next permanent FCC Chairman.  According to the report, Commissioner Pai will not need to go through Senate confirmation in order to become Chairman.  Instead, he will simply need the Senate to reappoint

atelier-reseau-internet-mondeAhead of the upcoming administration change, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) has continued its efforts focused on security and privacy. On December 16, 2016, the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB or Bureau) released a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) intended to facilitate dialogue and initiate action on the part of the communications industry to consider and integrate cybersecurity at the start of development of new 5G networks and technologies. Comments are due 90 days after publication in the Federal Register and reply comments are due 120 days after publication.

Continue Reading FCC Public Safety Bureau Inquires About How to Ensure 5G Network Security

According to a Public Notice the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released today, on December 15, 2016, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), has completed its review of the enhanced transparency rule from the 2015 Open Internet Order.

In the 2015 Order, the FCC adopted enhancements to the transparency rule, which covers both content

In late August, the Ninth Circuit ruled that AT&T was exempt from Federal Trade Commission oversight by virtue of its status as a common carrier, and dismissed an FTC case against AT&T over its practice of “throttling” customers’ mobile data usage. The FTC filed a request for en banc review by the full panel of the Ninth Circuit in mid-October. If the ruling stands, it could dramatically alter the jurisdictional boundaries between the FTC and FCC. In this podcast episode, paralegal Matt Weinmann interviews partner John Heitmann on the decision and its possible implications. To listen to this episode, please click here.

Continue Reading Implications for FTC Jurisdiction from Ninth Circuit Decision

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At the Federal Communications Commission’s (“FCC”) Open Meeting on October 27, the Commission voted along party lines (3-2) to impose more stringent rules on broadband Internet service providers (“ISPs”). Chairman Tom Wheeler, along with Commissioners Rosenworcel and Clyburn voted in favor of the item, while Commissioners Pai and O’Rielly voted against it.

The new rules clarify the privacy requirements applicable to broadband ISPs pursuant to Section 222 of the Communications Act. The new rules also apply to voice services and treat call-detail records as “sensitive” in the context of voice services.

According to an FCC press release issued immediately after the meeting, these rules “establish a framework of customer consent required for ISPs to use and share their customers’ personal information that is calibrated to the sensitivity of the information.” The Commission further asserts that this approach is consistent with the existing privacy framework of the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”).

Continue Reading FCC Votes to Impose Aggressive New Privacy Rules on Broadband Providers

stock_12192012_0878Showing that it’s not about to slow down its aggressive enforcement of its open Internet regulations, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced a settlement yesterday resolving claims that T-Mobile USA Inc. (T-Mobile) failed to adequately disclose material restrictions on T-Mobile and MetroPCS data plans that were advertised as “unlimited” from August 2014 to June 2015.  Specifically, the FCC’s investigation found that T‑Mobile failed to adequately disclose that it would significantly slow the speed of its customers’ “unlimited” data after they reached preset, undisclosed thresholds for data usage.

The FCC’s settlement requires T-Mobile to pay a total of $48 million. It further requires T-Mobile to clearly and conspicuously disclose any material limitations on the amount and speed of mobile data for its “unlimited” plans, and includes reporting and training obligations.

Continue Reading FCC Flexes Muscle: T-Mobile to Pay $48 Million for Failing to Disclose Limits on ‘Unlimited’ Data