With speculation running rampant that Chairman Pai intends to bring a remand order from ACA International v. FCC in January 2019, the FCC took a related step to reduce misdirected calls.  At the December Open Meeting, the FCC approved a Second Report and Order (“R&O”) to create a single, nationwide database for reporting number reassignments that will allow callers to verify whether a phone number was permanently disconnected before calling the number. The item is meant to reduce “wrong number” calls to mobile phones, i.e., where a caller has a legitimate reason for trying to reach a consumer but doesn’t realize that the number they have has been reassigned to someone else. The new rule would help eliminate a scenario where the new holder of the number receives an unwanted call and the prior holder never receives the call intended for them. The R&O is part of a broader effort by the FCC to address and stem the volume of unwanted phone calls in the United States.

Continue Reading In a Prelude to its TCPA Ruling, the FCC Votes to Create a Database to Identify Reassigned Numbers

Litigation under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) has exploded over the last few years.  During the course of such litigation, parties typically will seek the input of the Federal Communications Commission on issues of interpretation of the TCPA.  This may occur through a request from the court under the doctrine of primary jurisdiction, or, at times like this, through a request initiated by one of the litigants directly.  In the case below, a TCPA defendant is asking the FCC for relief in a case involving calls to mobile phones that previously were associated with a consenting subscriber, but which have been reassigned. Continue Reading Another TCPA Petition Reaches the FCC

Federal law prohibits the circumvention of technological measures used by or on behalf of copyright owners to protect their works. In the context of mobile handsets, although users previously enjoyed a limited exemption from this prohibition, a new ruling means that users no longer can use self-help to unlock their mobile phone and move it to an alternative network.

Periodically, through a rulemaking process, the Copyright Office (the “Agency”) takes comments and evaluates whether the prohibition on circumvention measures adversely impacts the ability to use the works in a non-infringing manner. Recommendations are made by the Agency to the Librarian of Congress, who then establishes exemptions to the access control circumvention prohibition by rule. This time around, the rule did not continue the exemption for unlocking mobile devices.

So what happened?

Continue Reading No More “Self-Help” Mobile Phone Unlocking