At its August Open Meeting, the Federal Communications Commission (“Commission” or “FCC”) unanimously initiated a major inquiry proceeding into what it labels “mid-band spectrum,” namely the frequencies between 3.7 GHz and 24 GHz.   The proceeding has major potential spectrum management ramifications for the coming years as the record developed could serve as a catalyst for future allocation and rule proceedings in a number of bands.  Recall that in late 2014, the Commission launched its Spectrum Frontiers inquiry proceeding into spectrum above 24 GHz, which led to an order adopting rules for flexible licensed and unlicensed use of almost eleven (11) gigahertz of spectrum in July 2016, and a further notice which may lead to as much as another eighteen (18) gigahertz becoming available in the near future.

In adopting its Notice of Inquiry (“NOI”), the Commission cited the need to meet “future demand” and the desire to “evaluate spectrum bands in all ranges.”  According to the Commission, in extremely general terms given the more than six-fold increase in wavelength between the bottom and top of the so-called “mid-band” range and the many pre-existing allocations throughout the range, these bands have better propagation characteristics (at least in some regards) than higher frequencies and hold out the promise for greater channel bandwidths than lower frequencies.
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On July 13, 2017, the three FCC Commissioners voted in favor of a Second Notice of Inquiry (NOI) to gather feedback on using numbering information to create comprehensive list that businesses can use to identify telephone numbers that have been reassigned from a consumer that consented to receiving calls to another consumer.  It also asks whether the Commission should “consider a safe harbor from [Telephone Consumer Protection Act] violations” for robocallers who use the reassigned number resource.  This action is the latest of several TCPA rulemaking actions initiated by Chairman Pai since he assumed leadership of the FCC.  While the action is a NOI – which is a precursor to proposed rules – the action signals the importance the new Chairman has placed on reducing the number of unwanted calls consumers receive.

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At the FCC’s open meeting on July 13, 2017, the Commissioners voted in favor of a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) on call authentication frameworks to allow telephone service providers to identify fraudulent calls.  The authentication procedures are intended to allow subscribers and carriers to know that callers are who they say they are.  Initial comments in response to the NOI are due on August 14, 2017 and replies are due on September 13, 2017.

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